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REVIEW: MOTEL WHORE & OTHER STORIES by Paul Heatley

‘WARNING – CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, SEXUAL CONTENT, AND SCENES OF VIOLENCE. SHOULD NOT BE READ BY ANYONE.’

So reads the back cover shout line.

I got a giggle, glance and uptight squint from a few people who noticed this, and the title, when reading it in public. A book can be a good person filter. I’ve discovered this over time with books. And, you can judge a book by it’s cover… or its radiated reaction it would seem. It drew the right  sort in. The more interesting people, the kind I don’t mind so much, smiled and asked me about it early on.

So, I knew I was onto a good thing.

Paul Heatley’s Motel Whore was like sharing a bath with David Lynch and Charles Bukowski – purist filth, pain and the bleakest kind of beauty. It’s a kind of bath that leaves you a shit-load dirtier than you went!
I loved it… the pages are filled with dirty-real characters, their intimate stories, bitter existences and all in such rich tasty detail. I couldn’t get enough and looked forward to each spare moment I could get to jump back in with them all.

‘Very addictive. Very noir. Very dirty and real.’ – John Bowie

So, another Paul Heatley fix is needed. I can’t resist dipping a toe back in or going for another full soak when no one’s looking.
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‘Motel Whore’s deliciously real seediness is both revolting and addictive; it left me needing the next hit; page, chapter, whore-tale and book.’ – John Bowie

As he recommended it himself; Fatboy – here I come.

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PAUL’S BIO

Paul Heatley lives in the north east of England. His short stories have appeared online and in print for publications such as Thuglit, Horror Sleaze Trash, Spelk, Near to the Knuckle, Shotgun Honey, the Pink Factory, and the Flash Fiction Offensive, among others. He also contributes music reviews to R2 magazine, sometimes.

His fiction is dark and bleak, populated with misfits and losers on a hellbound descent, often eschewing genre and geography to create a nightmarish vision of a harsh and uncaring world.

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